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BUS ETIQUETTE

genius_advice

2008-11-24 11:53:30

Opinions

Important! You need to read this post. Especially if you take public transit.
This is when you have a seat on a full bus you waited 10 minutes for:
how do you know when to give up your seat? Some decisions are obvious: pregnant ladies, old folks that look like they're dying, people with crutches, pregnant men, Obama, etc. And people with lots of baggage. No, not obese people, just people who think it's wise to carry a lot of 'stuff' on the bus on a rainy day. Without an umbrella.


The category I am most indecisive on is with the senior citizens. I know society in general demands respect for these folks out of courtesy, but how old do you have to be to take my seat? I get really confused when some of these guys, having white hair and probably run the marathon on the weekend, eye my seat maliciously while I, the sickly student (who waited for 10 minutes standing), would like nothing better than to sleep until kingdom come. I once asked a friend about this and he told me you can tell by their skin. Mainly if they're wrinkly or not. If you're seeing them wrinkles, move over Sonny! But honestly, how is that fair? Some days I just feel sick or very crappy. Another friend suggested to do what he did: pretend to have tuberculosis, cough occasionally, and play the sympathy card. I'll probably continue to do what I usually do at 7 o'clock in the morning. Sleep. Sorry Gramps, can't hear you.
Responses:

Hogan
In response to the last article, "Bus Etiquette", by Genius_Advice, I'd like to add the following observations about bus passenger behavior. On...

Comments

alishahnovin

alishahnovin

2008-11-24 14:18:44

I usually give up my seat even if I'm tired. Nothing cures my own tiredness than a feeling of moral superiority over the other passengers on the bus who then look up at you in admiration - I guess some people call that the "satisfaction of a good deed."

claudia

claudia

2008-11-24 15:44:21

I was just thinking this the other day when I was on the bus and this woman walked near the seat I was sitting in. I spent a couple of minutes debating whether to give her my seat which became more of an inner battle trying to decide whether she was old or not, she looked like she had had a facelift and this wasn't helping. My next inner battle was over whether I wanted to embarrass her by offering her my seat and therefore possibly insulting her. Usually I wouldn't have thought twice about pissing off someone like that but if they're going to be standing three inches away from me for a 40 minute bus ride I'll save myself the awkwardness. A couple days before that I had offered my seat to a man well in his eighties who was clearly having a hard time clinging to the bus pole. However I was very rudely refused, so this incident went into my assessment of the standing woman. Needless to say, before all this had finished going through my head some people had gotten off and she had moved down the bus.

Alamir

Alamir

2008-11-24 21:16:11

I have no problem giving up my seat to seniors. I figure if the guy looks like he'll need a cane in a few years he probably needs the seat more than I do. But whenever I'm in doubt, I just ask the person if they'd like to sit. Those people who refuse need to realize that it's a good custom for younger people to offer things to their elders. Then again, they may be the same jerks who never gave seats to the elderly when they were young and don't want to be a hypocrite. Sometimes they say no, and then you stay seated but the only problem I have with this is sometimes people say "no" to be polite but still need the seat more than you.
REPLIES: genius_advice

genius_advice

genius_advice

2008-11-24 21:20:31

Replying to Alamir:
Ah, so true. Every refusal makes me want to give up my seat less in the future. Kind of undermines 'manners'.



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