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SUBTEXTUAL THEORY

Jackson

2008-12-25 22:56:44

Other

1. Lyotardist narrative and the submaterial paradigm of context

If one examines the submaterial paradigm of context, one is faced with a choice: either reject cultural subtextual theory or conclude that narrativity may be used to reinforce outdated, sexist perceptions of class, given that consciousness is equal to sexuality. The main theme of the works of Stone is the meaninglessness, and subsequent failure, of capitalist society.

“Consciousness is part of the defining characteristic of culture,” says Debord; however, according to Sargeant , it is not so much consciousness that is part of the defining characteristic of culture, but rather the stasis of consciousness. However, Lyotard uses the term ‘Lyotardist narrative’ to denote the role of the writer as artist. Debord promotes the use of the submaterial paradigm of context to deconstruct hierarchy.

Therefore, Lacan uses the term ‘Lyotardist narrative’ to denote the futility, and subsequent defining characteristic, of neotextual society. Debord’s model of capitalist discourse implies that the significance of the poet is social comment.

In a sense, the characteristic theme of Drucker’s analysis of Lyotardist narrative is not theory, but posttheory. Porter holds that we have to choose between Lyotardist narrative and textual discourse.

But the subject is contextualised into a that includes sexuality as a totality. Sontag suggests the use of cultural subtextual theory to attack culture.
2. Pynchon and neocapitalist cultural theory

In the works of Pynchon, a predominant concept is the distinction between ground and figure. Therefore, Baudrillard uses the term ‘the submaterial paradigm of context’ to denote the failure of precapitalist class. The main theme of the works of Pynchon is the role of the reader as artist.

If one examines dialectic theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept Lyotardist narrative or conclude that the State is a legal fiction, but only if the submaterial paradigm of context is invalid; otherwise, Bataille’s model of Lyotardist narrative is one of “neocultural narrative”, and thus part of the fatal flaw of reality. But if Marxist class holds, we have to choose between the submaterial paradigm of context and textual discourse. Any number of desublimations concerning the difference between society and consciousness exist.

The primary theme of Sargeant’s model of Batailleist `powerful communication’ is not narrative per se, but prenarrative. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a that includes art as a paradox. Dietrich implies that we have to choose between the submaterial paradigm of context and subdeconstructivist theory.

In the works of Pynchon, a predominant concept is the concept of capitalist culture. It could be said that Derrida promotes the use of neocultural structural theory to deconstruct class divisions. The characteristic theme of the works of Pynchon is the bridge between society and sexual identity.

In a sense, the destruction/creation distinction intrinsic to Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49 emerges again in V. The primary theme of la Fournier’s critique of Lyotardist narrative is not, in fact, narrative, but neonarrative.

Therefore, an abundance of theories concerning the submaterial paradigm of context may be discovered. Sartre uses the term ‘cultural subtextual theory’ to denote a self-fulfilling totality.

But the main theme of the works of Pynchon is the meaninglessness, and subsequent genre, of dialectic class. In The Crying of Lot 49, Pynchon deconstructs the submaterial paradigm of context; in Gravity’s Rainbow, although, he affirms precapitalist discourse.

Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘Lyotardist narrative’ to denote not theory, as Sartre would have it, but subtheory. The absurdity, and therefore the meaninglessness, of the submaterial paradigm of context which is a central theme of Pynchon’s V is also evident in The Crying of Lot 49, although in a more semantic sense.

Thus, if Lyotardist narrative holds, we have to choose between the submaterial paradigm of context and Derridaist reading. Sartre uses the term ‘cultural subtextual theory’ to denote the defining characteristic of prematerialist society.
3. Narratives of paradigm

The primary theme of Dietrich’s analysis of Lyotardist narrative is not materialism, but neomaterialism. But several discourses concerning the difference between sexual identity and sexuality exist. The characteristic theme of the works of Gibson is a mythopoetical paradox.

In the works of Gibson, a predominant concept is the distinction between creation and destruction. Thus, Brophy states that we have to choose between cultural subtextual theory and subdialectic capitalist theory. The main theme of la Fournier’s model of Lyotardist narrative is not narrative per se, but neonarrative.

If one examines cultural subtextual theory, one is faced with a choice: either reject the submaterial paradigm of context or conclude that the purpose of the writer is significant form. It could be said that Lyotard uses the term ‘Lyotardist narrative’ to denote the bridge between class and society. The subject is contextualised into a submaterial paradigm of context that includes culture as a reality.

The characteristic theme of the works of Burroughs is the role of the reader as poet. However, the primary theme of Reicher’s essay on Foucaultist power relations is the economy, and some would say the futility, of predialectic sexual identity. In Beverly Hills 90210, Spelling denies cultural subtextual theory; in Melrose Place he deconstructs the textual paradigm of narrative.

Therefore, an abundance of discourses concerning cultural subtextual theory may be revealed. Debord suggests the use of Lyotardist narrative to modify and challenge truth.

But the characteristic theme of the works of Spelling is the role of the reader as participant. The subject is interpolated into a submaterial paradigm of context that includes reality as a totality.

Thus, Baudrillard promotes the use of cultural subtextual theory to deconstruct sexism. A number of desituationisms concerning a self-justifying paradox exist.

Therefore, the main theme of Prinn’s model of the submaterial paradigm of context is the role of the artist as poet. Any number of narratives concerning Lyotardist narrative may be discovered.

But Marx suggests the use of textual desublimation to analyse class. The subject is contextualised into a that includes narrativity as a reality.
4. Spelling and the submaterial paradigm of context

In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of neocultural consciousness. However, Bataille’s analysis of cultural subtextual theory holds that culture is capable of truth. If Lyotardist narrative holds, the works of Spelling are postmodern.

If one examines cultural subtextual theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept Foucaultist power relations or conclude that consciousness serves to oppress the proletariat. It could be said that Lyotardist narrative states that the law is capable of significance, but only if art is interchangeable with culture. Many situationisms concerning not, in fact, theory, but pretheory exist.

But Lacan promotes the use of cultural subtextual theory to attack hierarchy. De Selby holds that we have to choose between Lyotardist narrative and modern neotextual theory.

It could be said that an abundance of materialisms concerning the submaterial paradigm of context may be found. The example of dialectic libertarianism depicted in Smith’s Clerks emerges again in Mallrats.

But any number of deappropriations concerning a mythopoetical totality exist. Lyotard uses the term ‘cultural subtextual theory’ to denote the economy, and hence the paradigm, of subsemanticist society.

Therefore, the primary theme of the works of Smith is the common ground between class and society. Several discourses concerning Lyotardist narrative may be discovered.
5. Discourses of futility

“Class is used in the service of sexism,” says Bataille. It could be said that the premise of Foucaultist power relations implies that the raison d’etre of the observer is social comment. Debord suggests the use of cultural subtextual theory to modify and read sexual identity.

“Class is part of the failure of reality,” says Sartre; however, according to Humphrey , it is not so much class that is part of the failure of reality, but rather the futility, and subsequent dialectic, of class. In a sense, if Lyotardist narrative holds, the works of Smith are an example of self-fulfilling nationalism. The subject is interpolated into a submaterial paradigm of context that includes art as a paradox.

However, the characteristic theme of McElwaine’s critique of cultural subtextual theory is not theory, but pretheory. The subject is contextualised into a submaterial paradigm of context that includes consciousness as a totality.

It could be said that Debord promotes the use of Lyotardist narrative to challenge elitist perceptions of society. The subject is interpolated into a that includes culture as a whole.

Thus, the primary theme of the works of Burroughs is the difference between consciousness and sexual identity. Sontag suggests the use of the submaterial paradigm of context to modify society.

It could be said that Hubbard holds that we have to choose between postcultural desituationism and the constructive paradigm of reality. Any number of theories concerning the rubicon, and therefore the futility, of subsemanticist sexual identity exist.
6. Lyotardist narrative and textual neocapitalist theory

If one examines textual neocapitalist theory, one is faced with a choice: either reject the conceptual paradigm of narrative or conclude that reality may be used to entrench the status quo, given that cultural subtextual theory is valid. However, if textual neocapitalist theory holds, we have to choose between Lyotardist narrative and subtextual narrative. In The Soft Machine, Burroughs examines cultural neocapitalist theory; in Naked Lunch, although, he deconstructs textual neocapitalist theory.

“Society is intrinsically elitist,” says Lyotard. But von Ludwig states that we have to choose between cultural subtextual theory and cultural theory. Baudrillard uses the term ‘textual neocapitalist theory’ to denote a mythopoetical paradox.

Therefore, Derrida’s essay on cultural subtextual theory suggests that language is impossible. The characteristic theme of la Fournier’s model of textual neocapitalist theory is the bridge between class and society.

It could be said that Lacan promotes the use of Lyotardist narrative to deconstruct hierarchy. The subject is contextualised into a that includes culture as a totality.

Therefore, Bataille uses the term ‘Lyotardist narrative’ to denote a cultural paradox. Many desemioticisms concerning Foucaultist power relations may be revealed.

1. Sargeant, K. (1976) Reinventing Constructivism: Cultural subtextual theory in the works of Pynchon. Harvard University Press

2. Drucker, N. Z. O. ed. (1999) Nihilism, cultural subtextual theory and prestructuralist textual theory. O’Reilly & Associates

3. Porter, Y. D. (1987) Submodernist Narratives: Cultural subtextual theory in the works of Spelling. Oxford University Press

4. Sargeant, V. ed. (1970) Cultural subtextual theory in the works of Pynchon. University of Illinois Press

5. Dietrich, C. N. (1986) The Burning House: Cultural subtextual theory in the works of Cage. University of Oregon Press

6. la Fournier, W. S. R. ed. (1993) Cultural subtextual theory and Lyotardist narrative. And/Or Press

7. Dietrich, O. (1972) Forgetting Foucault: Cultural subtextual theory in the works of Gibson. Harvard University Press

8. Brophy, Y. Z. Y. ed. (1989) Cultural subtextual theory, capitalist theory and nihilism. Yale University Press

9. la Fournier, T. (1978) The Failure of Reality: Cultural subtextual theory in the works of Burroughs. O’Reilly & Associates

10. Reicher, Q. A. ed. (1995) Lyotardist narrative in the works of Spelling. University of Massachusetts Press

11. Prinn, L. (1988) Reassessing Socialist realism: Lyotardist narrative and cultural subtextual theory. Panic Button Books

12. de Selby, W. A. ed. (1973) Cultural subtextual theory in the works of Smith. Harvard University Press

13. Humphrey, C. H. N. (1980) Consensuses of Meaninglessness: Cultural subtextual theory and Lyotardist narrative. Yale University Press

14. McElwaine, V. ed. (1996) Lyotardist narrative in the works of Burroughs. University of Illinois Press

15. Hubbard, N. R. (1973) Deconstructing Modernism: Cultural subtextual theory in the works of Fellini. And/Or Press

16. von Ludwig, D. Q. N. ed. (1996) Lyotardist narrative and cultural subtextual theory. University of Michigan Press

17. la Fournier, V. (1971) The Iron Sea: Cultural subtextual theory and Lyotardist narrative. University of North Carolina Press
Comments

Hogan

Hogan

2008-12-25 23:17:50

Sounds a lot like your other fake essay, Scott. It might seem real if you added short intros and conclusions. Too many "holds".

I was amused to learn, from the website that generates these bullshit, meaningless, pomo essays, that one of them was actually accepted by a journal of some sort. I'd like to know which one, and what the essay looked like, that is, if it didn't look exactly like the two you've posted.

Jackson

Jackson

2008-12-26 03:55:46

I'll look it up. I studies this program in one of my seminars.



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